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The Published Author Podcast

GET READERS TO BINGE YOUR BOOK THE WAY YOU BINGE NETFLIX

It’s every content marketer's ambition to create content that hooks their audience and has them coming back for more. 

Marketers want followers to eagerly await content and consume everything they produce. 

Not many marketers succeed, and this is particularly true in saturated niches where even the best content doesn’t make it to the top of search engine page results.

However, a new book by Dutch author Carlijn Postma, guest on today’s episode of the Published Author podcast.

Carlijn’s book, Binge Marketing, recommends that creators of content stop looking at what other content creators are doing, and instead pay attention to the entertainment industry and learn from it.

LEARN FROM TV AND MOVIE SHOWRUNNERS AND WRITERS

As the Amazon description for the book details, Binge Marketing takes readers to the place where content is the product and the people who create it know how to attract and retain an audience. Those people, of course, are writers and showrunners in Hollywood. 

The writers for that TV show you can’t get enough of are using a set of tactics that keep you coming back for more. In her Binge Marketing, Carlijn tells content marketers to compare their brand with the scenario of a very good television series and consider every single statement and marketing activity you put out there as an episode of that series. As a true showrunner, you can build on your own loyal and involved audience.

A family scenario familiar to many parents was the seed of Carlijn’s idea for Binge Marketing. She tells show host Josh Steimle that she’s spent plenty of evenings trying to get her daughters to bed after an episode of Netflix show Once Upon a Time.

CREATE CONTENT AUDIENCES WANT TO BINGE ON

After each episode Carlijn’s two girls would never just get up and head off to sleep. “Every episode ends with a cliffhanger. And so they kept on watching and I do the same. And I think every listener who watches TV series does the same thing. You just keep on binging and consuming those episodes, because they never end. 

She says: “That's when it occurred to me that this is exactly what we should do in marketing. We should look at the creators of films and series; they know exactly how to tell a compelling story and also how to engage an audience, define it, and to retain it.”

As a marketer, Carlijn knows that markets have for a long time struggled to get their stories across in the most efficient, but also brand-worthy way, while at the same time building an audience.

FOR SUCCESSFUL BINGE MARKETING, DON’T LET YOUR STORIES END

Carlijn points out that with TV shows, the story never really ends. “What we do in marketing is we just write stories that have a start and an end. They all end. But why? Why do we do that? If we want to try to build an audience, why do we stop with our stories? Why don't we just follow the creators of series and just create a series and create episodes and keep on letting people watch?

“That's the way you can build an audience. With only one episode that has a start and middle and an end, you won't build an audience.

Carlijn actually used her binge technique in her own book, although it took two drafts to get the tactic integrated into her work. Like most published authors, she first focused on getting everything down on paper. The second time around, she was able to edit and include some cliffhangers. And it sounds as though there will be another book, because Carlijn notes that Binge Marketing “ends with no end.”

HOW AUTHORS CAN USE BINGE MARKETING IN THEIR BOOKS

Carlijn says that authors who want to incorporate binge marketing into their book should first of all determine exactly what their book is about and be able to summarize it in a paragraph. Understanding where the story is set, who’s telling it, and who the audience is. Answering these questions will make it much easier to use binge marketing in your book.

On your author platform, Carlijn recommends creating other forms of content that illustrate your expertise and showcase examples of how you use your expertise in your own work. For example, to illustrate her expertise with binge marketing, Carlijn’s podcast includes an interview with Dutch film director Martin Koolhoven, The Hollywood Way To Content Marketing (in English).

Learn more: If you appreciated this episode, listen to:

Author And SEO Pro Eli Schwartz on Product-Led SEO, Adaptability, Curiosity

And:

Storytelling Essential For Nonfiction Books To Succeed

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ABOUT THE HOST

The Published Author Podcast is hosted by Josh Steimle, founder of Published Author. Josh is a book author himself and his article writing has been featured in over two dozen publications including Time, Forbes, Fortune, Mashable, and TechCrunch. He's a TEDx speaker, the founder of the global marketing agency MWI, a skater, father, and husband, and lives on a horse farm in Boston. Learn more at JoshSteimle.com.

EPISODE TRANSCRIPT

Josh Steimle:

Welcome to the Published Author Podcast where we help entrepreneurs learn how to write a book and leverage it to grow their business and make an impact. I’m your host, Josh Steimle.
Today, my guest is Carlijn Postma. Carlijn is the founder of the Post, a content marketing agency in the Netherlands, and the author of Binge Marketing: The Best Scenario for Building Your Brand. Carlijn, welcome to the show.

Carlijn Postma:

Thank you very much. Thank you for having me.

Josh Steimle:

So before we get into your book, Binge Marketing, which I’ve got right here on my desk, I just – I was telling Carlijn before the episode, I just found out about this book a few weeks ago, and a friend of mine said, you got to read this book, it's really good. And I picked it up, I started reading it, I was like, this is really good, there's some great fundamental marketing stuff in here, especially in view of how Netflix messes with us and gets us to binge on their stuff. So we're going to dig into that. But first, Carlijn, tell us a little bit more about your background and growing up, and how you got involved in marketing, and then what was the inspiration to write this book.

Carlijn Postma:

Okay, it's a lot of questions to start with, but just a bit about myself, I am, well, I’m from the Netherlands. I live in the Netherlands, and grew up there. Well, actually, I think since I was about eight years old, I always wanted to become a journalist. And then right before I had to choose the college where, well, it's a different system here, but what I was going to become, then I turned into advertising. So, well, I went to HBO, they call it here, it's higher education, and studied marketing, and that's also what I started in. I think the first six years of my working life, I was in marketing, I was in advertising. So I always say I learned so much about how things, well, about working and about marketing and about how business works. And then, in 2006, that was then I quit my job and started for myself, because I thought there was more to do with internet, and the agency that I worked for, well, it was not in their business plan, a lift from creation and of course media, as I think a lot of agencies did. So I started for myself, and well, I think that's also when I kind of got more interested in social media and stuff. And well, the first book, because the book that we're talking about today is the first book in English, and that is my first book that I wrote, and the first book was about Twitter in 2010, and that was something – well, I think 2009 Twitter got a little bigger in the Netherlands, it came around at that time too. And I wrote the first book, and it was kind of a bestseller in the Netherlands, but it was Dutch. And yeah, well, I think that's the beginning of when I thought, well, if you can write, you can spread the word, you can start conversation, you can learn things, because you have to write it down, and you have to check it. And I think it's where I just got a little bit back from my dream of becoming a journalist, and I always say, it's a bit of both.

Josh Steimle:

When you wrote that first book on Twitter, did that help you with your business at all then?

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah, certainly. Well, it was a bit the other way around, because I did not decide for myself to write that book on Twitter. But in my agency, I was curious about what could Twitter do for businesses. So I started with workshops, and Twitter is not very difficult, as you may be aware of, but I started with, well, training organizations to how to use Twitter and how to educate the employees, and then all of a sudden, a publisher came to me and asked if I could write it down. And it certainly helps because, well, the first – I think the first couple of months after the book was published, was launched, I was in a lot of media – well, there was a lot of media about it, and also I got more training to do.

Josh Steimle:

Yeah, because you're probably the only person who had written a book on Twitter in Dutch, I’m guessing at that point.

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah, the first, at least. Not the only one afterwards.

Josh Steimle:

So then what was your second book after that?

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah, well, the second book was about personal branding. But I have to say, timing was an issue there, because the book launched, I think, seven days after I gave birth to my second daughter. And I remember, I got a call from a radio station...

Josh Steimle:

You had your hands full.

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah, my mind full, I think, because I had a call from a radio station, if I could come over and discuss the book, and I just said no, and [inaudible 00:05:36] never say no to whatever it is, never say no, because, one, if you have one – how do you call that – if you're in one of the newspapers or in a podcast, the rest will follow. So if you quit the first one, I don't think people will call you again. So the second book was...

Josh Steimle:

So you missed your opportunity...

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah.

Josh Steimle:

So you can blame your daughter forever, you can say, you messed up my PR opportunity, but it was worth it.

Carlijn Postma:

That's a good one.

Josh Steimle:

And so, then you had another book, so was Binge Marketing your fourth book or you had four books before?

Carlijn Postma:

Yes, my fourth book.

Josh Steimle:

Fourth book, so then what was book number three?

Carlijn Postma:

Book number three was Content Marketing in 60 minutes. So I already, well, repositioned my agency for interactive communication into an agency for content marketing, because I think that's where everything comes together with whatever social network, whatever channel you use, it's about the stories, it's about whatever you want to share. And afterwards, well, just pick your channel to spread the word. But this is just in a nutshell, but Content Marketing in 60 minutes was in 2014, and it was a good book. I think it was the start of the methodology that I described in the Binge Marketing, which is my fourth book indeed. But I did not look at Netflix at that time yet. It was more like become a publisher as a content – well, as a brand, and the fourth book was, well, that was translated and that's also the reason I think that we are discussing this book right now is Binge Marketing, and this is about if you want to share your story as a brand and try to translate your brand story into the scenario of a great television series. And that's the link with Netflix, well, there are so many learnings from the [inaudible 00:07:50] creating of series and films, and it was time to write that down, yeah.

Josh Steimle:

Is Netflix big in the Netherlands?

Carlijn Postma:

Yes, it's a number one streaming service. I don't know how many but a lot.

Josh Steimle:

Before I moved to Massachusetts, I lived in China, and Netflix is illegal in China, they don't have it, it's blocked. And so, I kind of, I was living in Asia for most of the past six to eight years, and I wasn't really familiar with usage patterns on Netflix until I came back to the US, and then it was like, wow, everybody is using Netflix. But I still wasn't sure if it was more of a US centric thing or a global thing, and it seems like it's a global thing everywhere except China.

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah, it's [inaudible 00:08:38]. When did you return to the States?

Josh Steimle:

About two years ago.

Carlijn Postma:

Two years ago, okay, yeah then I think Netflix was already global, except for...

Josh Steimle:

Yeah, except for China. So with Binge Marketing then, did you say that you wrote it in Dutch first?

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah.

Josh Steimle:

And you published it in Dutch first. Did the Dutch version come out – when did that come out versus the English version?

Carlijn Postma:

Dutch version was, I think, exactly one year before October 2019. But I think, and that's something that occurred to me in the past couple of years I think, there's only 23 million people who speak Dutch. And how many of those are marketers? It's such a small number. So I thought, if I want to share this approach more widely, then it has to be translated. So I looked for a publisher who saw something in the book and I found it, and then it took a lot of time, I don't know why, but it took a year, yeah.

Josh Steimle:

Okay. And then it was just released in early 2021, recently, right, in English?

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah, it was released in English, but at the end of 2020, but due to COVID, it got delayed for launch in the US. I think it was in the end of January that Amazon picked it up for the US.

Josh Steimle:

Okay, got it. So give us some more insight into why you wrote this book. What was the inspiration? Why did you feel like this is a really important book that needed and this story needs to be told, or these ideas need to be shared?

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah, well, at my content marketing agency, The Post which I founded, but I sold the company, by the way, last year, so I could work a little bit more or actually a lot more on getting Binge Marketing out there. But in my work as a marketer, I always got the same questions, and it's something that I was looking for a solution for brands to, well, actually to get an audience and to retain that audience. And I think it's at the beginning of my book as well, but it was at one evening that I was, well, there's so many times that I was arguing with my daughters that they had to go to bed after we watched an episode of Once Upon a Time – Once Upon a Time is a series that streamed on Netflix. But they never just stood up and went upstairs because every episode ends with a cliffhanger. And so, they kept on watching, and I do the same, and I think every listener who watches the series does the same thing. You just keep on binging, you could keep on consuming these episodes because it never ends. And that's when it occurred to me that I thought this is exactly what we should do in marketing. We should look at the creators of films and series. What they do is content marketing. They know exactly how to tell a compelling story and also how to engage an audience and define it and to retain it. And that’s the same problem or actually the struggle that we have as marketers trying to get our story across in the most efficient, but also brand worthy way and build an audience at the same time. So that's when I started looking into, I think it's the things that people who write series already know, it's something that is just, it's just there. If you write a story, if you write a series, never finish your episode, you always have a quick flash forward to the next episode, so people just keep on watching. And what we do in marketing is we just write stories that have a start and an end. They all end. But why do we do that? Why, if we want to try to build an audience, why do we stop with our stories? Why don't we just follow the creators of series and just create a series and create episodes and let people keep on watching? That's the way you can build an audience, and with only one episode that has a start and middle and an end, you won't build an audience.

Josh Steimle:

Yeah. I’ve noticed, I really got clued into this when the Marvel movies started coming out, and I started watching the Marvel Cinematic Universe movies. And at the end of every one of these movies, I thought, oh, I can't believe this is over, like, I mean, they would have some sort of huge cliffhanger at the end of the movie and then they give you these previews during the credits. And it makes it – you're so excited for the next movie in that series to come out, and, I mean, I don't know if there's any other major motion picture series that has this many episodes in it. I mean, they're up to like 30 movies or something. And it's just crazy that they can just keep this going and it's like a money printing machine for them. I mean, every time they put out a movie we've got a near billion dollar movie every single time they release one.

Carlijn Postma:

And now it's not only the movies anymore, they also have the series like WandaVision and the Winter Soldier, what is it [inaudible 00:14:40] sorry the Captain America, the Winter Soldier and the Falcon.

Josh Steimle:

Yeah, it's the Winter Soldier one, they have all these breakups and then they have like the one where they go back and they look at S.H.I.E.L.D., Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and all this.

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah, well, and that's also something I refer to in my book because the Marvel Cinematic Universe, what you just said, that's brilliantly thought of, because they have an audience, for example, Iron Man, and then in that same arena, in the same decor, they have Thor, they have Spider-Man a little bit. They have all these characters, and I compare it to, if you have a multi-brand strategy, people are just creating new stories, new campaigns for every brand. But what if you could create your own Marvel Cinematic Universe? So one domain where all those brands have their own stories, but also, you can make the crossovers. So you don't have to start building new audiences for every brand that you're going to launch. So it's all those smart things that they use in these creators of content, because this is what they do best. I think there are so many things that we can learn from them in marketing. And it surprises me that, well, I haven't seen or read about it a lot before, so I think it's really easy to look at those things and, well, add them to your own strategy.

Josh Steimle:

So when you were writing your book, were you thinking, how do I use what I’m teaching as I’m writing my book, and as I’m putting the chapters together. Was that something going through your mind?

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah, you mean to binge the chapters?

Josh Steimle:

Right. To actually get people binge reading your book and getting through it all the way to the end, and then wanting more.

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah, and at the same time, the process of writing, well, maybe you recognize it, it's just getting the stuff on paper. So of course, you try to do that, but I think that what I did the second time I read it, because at first you just have to get it out of there – get it out of your head and get it on paper and try to make it sound logical. And afterwards, I try to get that [inaudible 00:17:15] I think you call it, throughout all the chapters. And, of course, it ends with no end.

Josh Steimle:

Yeah, exactly. So how far does this go back, this idea of tying things together like this, I mean, can you think, I mean, what's the first example of marketing or media that you can look back on and say, hey, they were clued into this even way back then – are there old TV shows? Does it even predate TV that you can look back and say, hey, they were using binge marketing 300 years ago or something in this society?

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah, I think the usage of a cliffhanger, I wrote it down in my book, I don't know what year it was, but it's like a story, like a fairy tale that a woman was – oh wow, this is very hard to explain in English – she was sentenced to death. But she kept on telling a story every night and she didn't finish it, so she kept on pushing the death date, she postponed it every day. And this is like the first example, I think it was a book series or something of using this cliffhanger idea, but I think writers of novels, of books already use it a lot, because there are so many books that you can't stop reading. But usually, it's fiction, but we also should do that with nonfiction and, well, in marketing as well. So I don't know if it's – let's say it's not new, it's only the idea of adding it to marketing, while knowing it. I think that is something we should do a lot more.

Josh Steimle:

Yeah. So one of the challenges I’ve run into, with this concept is, like, with a book or a TV show, where it's very structured, it's scripted, you're writing it out, you can edit it, like you said, with the book, you get your ideas out first, and then you can go back and you can figure out, okay, what should I have for cliffhangers or how do I leave an open loop at the end of the chapter so that people have to go to the next chapter to close that loop. But there are other mediums where this is a little bit tricky to do, for example, podcasting, I don't know who my next guest is going to be yet. Or if I’m doing something live on TV or on radio or something, how do you create that open loop that people feel like, oh, I’ve got to close this when you don't necessarily know what's coming next?

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah, I think we don't have to use only the same type of content, so a podcast refers to the next podcast, to the next podcast, and it's not necessary in binge marketing. You can also have this podcast and then refer to an interview in writing, for example, next week, or maybe because I think the idea of bingeing is that you know there are multiple episodes. You can also refer back to previous episodes. But also, the other way around, if you have this episode, then you have to cut it into pieces and share it across all the social media, for example, that you have. So I think you don't have to binge every episode in a chronological way. You can binge all the way around [inaudible 00:21:18] I also think it's not necessary to get all the episodes out there at the same time, because people can – you don't know when your audience is going to listen to it or watch it. And I think for podcasts, it's the same thing, now you don't know who your next guest is, but maybe in two weeks you do know. And if people – if you've seen your data, that people are still listening to this podcast, you can also put an add-on to it, and then refer to something that is relevant for your audience in the podcast that you're going to record in two weeks, for example.

Josh Steimle:

Very true. So other than Netflix and Marvel, who are some of the companies that are out there that are doing a really good job at this?

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah, that's a hard question, because I have some examples in my book in the Netherlands [inaudible 00:22:18] because that's where I live and I consume the examples there, of course. But what I saw a couple of weeks ago, and I was very interested by it, I didn't get more details unfortunately. But Headspace, I don't know if you know, Headspace has Mindfulness app, and they have their series on Netflix right now. And I think that’s brilliantly thought of, because people are consuming it on Netflix. And it's, I think it can only work for the app to be downloaded so many times, because of the series honestly. I don't like the series on Netflix by the way, its quality thing is, like, it can be different maybe. But I think a lot of companies that started in the last couple of years are thinking this way. A lot of, well, the mindfulness apps, of course, but also the influencers on workouts and stuff, they all do the same thing.

Josh Steimle:

And as authors, those listening to this podcast, trying to get tips on how to be a better author, how to write a better book, write a book that people are really going to be interested in, what are some of the other tips that they can take away other than having a cliffhanger at the end of a chapter or something like that, what are some of the other ways that authors can implement the things that you've learned about binge marketing to craft their book and make that book spread further and wider and faster?

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah, I think if I compare the story you're about to write in your book, if you compare that to the scenario of a great television series, and you start with the back flap, and maybe it's also what you started already, but if you can tell us in one paragraph what your story is about, what your book is about, then you have your plot summary, as I call it. What is it about? What can we expect? Maybe who is telling it? Are you telling it? Is it filled with testimonials, for example, with client cases? Those are the things you have to think about upfront, and I think that's already written in my book, four things, who is the one telling you a story, but also, what things can we describe, can we distract from it actually, and where does it play, and that's more like the arena maybe, the example that I just gave about the Marvel Cinematic Universe, the domain on where those brands like Thor, Iron Man have their part. So what are we talking about in your book? What is your arena? And maybe [inaudible 00:25:18] is it educational? I think there a lot of books that are educational, maybe it can be fiction, maybe it can be documentary, humor, some things you can think of upfront. And the next thing, if you have a plot summary, like the back flap of your book, you also have to think about who your audience is. And I use the audience journey for it, and the audience journey gives you insights on what is relevant to your audience at what moment in his journey. And it's kind of a technical thing to explain in a podcast, but it gives you an idea of what makes your audience move. And if you know what makes your audience move, then you know that you have to write your episodes on it, and maybe your episodes can be compared to chapters in your book. So I didn't think of this before, but I think it's a good example to use this book as also a template to write your episodes, to write your chapters.

Josh Steimle:

So do you think about, I mean, you have a book, you're trying to market your book, you're trying to get the word out there, how do you use these principles with your platform, with your website, with your social media, with any PR speaking that you're doing, how do you use what you're an expert at in those areas to drive more interest in your book and get people to read it?

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah, good question. Well, I created an online course for it, and in my online course, I also have the examples of what I use myself to attract audiences to, for example, my website, and what I do is I try to get experts from this other industry, like, the experts in film making and the creators of series, and I just ask them everything there is to know. So for example, I interviewed Martin Koolhoven, he's a film director from the Netherlands. The podcast is in English, by the way. But one of the things that he added to my idea of binge marketing is how do you create a second season, for example. Can everything have a second season? Can every book author have a second book or a third book? And is it like in the same series? And those questions I still get to ask. So the book writing was something I did when I worked with clients, and now I try to get the experts to add more knowledge about everything I did not write down yet, and I ask them everything. And then I try to have, like the expert in marketing to check it, can they use it this way or can't they. And that's my idea of what I’m trying to create now in blogs and articles and podcasts that I'm still trying to make.

Josh Steimle:

Yeah, so you're creating all this additional content that's related to your book, but it all ties back to the book, and then it makes people feel like, okay, to really get this, I need to go read the book to understand fully what she's talking about in this blog post or social media post.

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah, and it's also a challenge for myself, because once you've written the book, then you think, well, the subject is finished, but I think it's never finished, because once it's published, there are new things that you find out or you just have new examples. So just keep on building upon this idea of binge marketing, and that's what I’m trying to do indeed, yeah.

Josh Steimle:

So, with the book, I'm curious to get into the technical aspects of actually producing this book, and it's interesting as a case study, because, like you said, you wrote this in Dutch first and then you had to translate it into English. So you said you hired a translator. Is that right? Or did your publisher hire a translator?

Carlijn Postma:

No, I hired a translator because I had to. I had to give them the translated manuscript, and then they did the editing.

Josh Steimle:

Okay, got it. And so you worked with a publisher, LID Publishing, it looks like. So did they specialize in US distribution or English language distribution, or, why did you choose this publisher?

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah, well, I didn't really choose, I wrote to my Dutch publisher, I asked if they knew a publisher for the English market. And there were a lot of big publishers that were not interested because they do a lot of the, well, like, these kind of books, the bigger books with 1000 pages for colleges, for universities and so on. And this is more a practical book. It's a marketing book, of course. And this was actually the first, I think it's also the third that they wrote, and they saw something in it to get it translated and published. It was just an excerpt – they just got an excerpt of the book, and based on that, they said, well, we would like to do that, and that's when I had it translated for [inaudible 00:31:32] pages, yeah.

Josh Steimle:

So you already knew they were going to publish it when you got it translated?

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah.

Josh Steimle:

Got it. And what was the editing process like, doing editing in a second language that isn't your first language, was that challenging or what was that like?

Carlijn Postma:

I learned a lot, I learned a lot of new words. That's quite hard.

Josh Steimle:

I can only imagine because I lived in Brazil for a while, I speak Portuguese somewhat fluently. But when I sit down to write in Portuguese, oh, it is so hard to do, I mean, I can speak it just fine, but if I go to sit down and write it, it's a whole different ballgame for me.

Carlijn Postma:

I think it's the other way around with me. Well, I do speak a lot more in English now, but with writing, I think writing, it gives me time. And, of course, English is our second language here in the Netherlands, in almost all over Europe, but it's just so many words that I didn't recognize – well, I did recognize them, of course, but I didn't know that that was the word for it.

Josh Steimle:

Right. There are so many nuances with language and with words, and we take it for granted when we speak or write in our own language. But as soon as you translate it, it's like, wait, is this exactly the right word to use here, or, should I use this other one. And it can really get tricky a little bit...

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah, and that’s also why it's not a matter only of translation, it's translating and copywriting at the same time. Because, of course, in Dutch, I can find like 10 different ways to say something; but in English, I have one, maybe two; and that's why you really need someone that understands copywriting.

Josh Steimle:

So what are your hopes for this book? You said you sold The Post, so you're no longer running your agency. So it sounds like you're full time talking about Binge Marketing and doing speaking, I assume. What else are you trying to build with this book in the future in your career?

Carlijn Postma:

Yeah, well, of course, I still do things with The Post, because, well, I started the binge marketing – they're the only agency that uses binge marketing for real with brands. So I like to be part of that. But the second thing is, I’m working on just professionalizing content marketing on a larger scale. And binge marketing, I’ve got this angle of binge marketing, and, of course, I look at every example through the eyes of, could it be serialized, is this building an audience, what else can they do. And I call it binge marketing, but, well, the profession is, of course, the field of content marketing, and that's where I try to coach and to train people, I do my own courses, of course, with the binge marketing angle. And we already talked about language, and language is something that, in Europe, we've got 24 different languages, but also 27 countries in the EU, as a member of the EU, but how come that we don't get access to cases from Germany, for example, access to cases from France or Romania, Poland, you can name every country. But if brands and professionals are writing in their own language for their own audiences, then we don't get to see it. But I think there was a lot to learn there, and that's what I do as a second thing, and that's also why I'm in Munich right now to interview someone from a German company with a German case, to get it translated to have the, I call it, I’m trying to unlock content marketing in Europe, because of all those different languages. We only get access to examples in the UK and in the States, of course, but the rest, Danish, for example, Danish cases are written in Danish, but they're just as brilliant and just as interesting for the Dutch or for the Germans as well. So I’m trying to connect those things.

Josh Steimle:

That's great. Are you already working on a next book?

Carlijn Postma:

No. Actually, no, but I think it's – I never really start working on a book, I'm just doing the things. It's also, I started – my first propose in 2010, then 2011, ‘14, ‘19, ‘20. And I think it's the experience while I’m working that makes me think about new books, new things to write. But I think this is not ready yet. The methodology is in his book, and now I'm trying to get more information, more ideas, more people in scriptwriting, in film writing, for example, to share their ideas with me. That's the first thing.

Josh Steimle:

So you're collecting lots of information, and at some point, you'll have a bunch of stuff and you'll say, hey, I could turn this into a book.

Carlijn Postma:

Exactly. That's how it works most of the time, yeah.

Josh Steimle:

Well, Carlijn, thanks so much for being with us here today on the Published Author Podcast. If people want to reach out and connect with you, where's the best place for them to find you?

Carlijn Postma:

I think you can best start with my website, carlijnpostma.com. It's also bingemarketing.eu, and you get to the same page. And you can start with the book, of course, to read the book, I think it explains a lot. And I’ve created a course if you want to really work with the methodology, you can follow this course and you can also find that one on carlijnpostma.com.

Josh Steimle:

Perfect. Well, thanks so much for being with us here today on the show.

Carlijn Postma:

Well, thank you for inviting me. It was a pleasure.

Josh Steimle:

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