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Build Trust By Focusing On Problems, Not Solutions w/ Ari Galper

What will convince your customers to work with you, talking about their problems or about your solution? Ari Galper, the world’s top authority on trust-based selling, says it’s all about the problem. Think about it—if someone trusts you enough, you could say, “I’ve got the solution to your problem, let’s sign you up,” and you wouldn’t even need to tell them what the solution is. To build trust, talk about your customers’ problems. Now, apply this to the book you’re writing to grow your business—are you talking more about solutions or spending your time showing your customers that you understand their problems?

Every episode of this podcast may be helpful, but this episode will be a game-changer.

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EPISODE TRANSCRIPT

Josh Steimle:

Today, my guest is Ari Galper. Ari is the number one authority on trust-based selling and has been featured in Forbes, Inc, and CEO magazines, as well as a bunch of other places. 

His book, Unlock The Sales Game is designed to eliminate the dreaded act of chasing your customers. He says people lose the sale, not because you haven't demonstrated enough value, but because you haven't created enough trust.  

Ari, welcome to the show. 

Ari Galper:

Thank you. Excited about being here. Appreciate it.  

Josh Steimle:

Ari, give us a little bit more background on who you are and where you come from. 

How did you get into sales and what are you doing today? What's your business? 

Ari Galper:

I'm from the US but now I live in Australia. I live in Sydney. Been here for about 18 years now. Met my wife on an online dating site 18 years ago, pre-swiping. This is like just image and text. That's pretty much it. We went back and forth and got engaged.  

Now I've been here for 18 years running the virtual consulting business via my book for a couple of decades. 

I specialize in a unique field, a niche called "trust-based selling", which is how to successfully remove the tension, pressure, and rejection from the sales process so you can be fully authentic, be very effective without sacrificing your soul along the process. Which so many of us hate to deal with, especially authors.  

Josh Steimle:

If there's anybody out there who loves chasing customers and loves that tension, this might not be the episode for you, but everybody else... 

Ari Galper:

Exactly. Right, exactly. I found there's a massive audience of people out there who've been conditioned to sell the old way. Meaning all they know the definition of selling to be is to present themselves, to convince, to persuade, to pursue the opportunity. Unfortunately, that's that 1980s approach to the model. Doesn't work anymore.  

Given the way the people have changed. Given the world changed dramatically the last couple of years, and what I teach and have a whole body of work around it for the last two decades is a notion that you can build trust with somebody quickly if you're in a fully authentic with them and you're focused on their world, not your own, and you're not using any sales techniques that you're probably used to.  

So a lot of this is detoxing from the old way of thinking and really being yourself, but not in a way where you're chit-chatting with someone which would be more of a doctor and a patient relationship. We are diagnosing their problem. That's a general notion. 

Josh Steimle:

How did you develop this model? How did it come up?  

Ari Galper:

Started happening to me about 20 years ago which I'll share with you now. It was, I wasn't. I used to be a sales manager in a software company and we lost the first online website tracking tool to collect website behavior now is called Google analytics. I'm sure you've probably heard of that, but and now it's free. 

I could ask you cost money. We, the first one launch that product, and I was managing 18 people underneath me, salespeople, and the big opportunity came across my desk. So I got this one call that came through a website. It was a big lead, big opportunity, big company. 

They agree to a conference call to see our product. And they came Friday, four o'clock afternoon. They want to see a demo. And we, I was in the conference with my CEO. I closed her behind me, a big long conference table. And the table is the old school speakerphone. You know, the four legs on it, star Trek, looking black phones. Dial the number to my contact. 

He says, hello. He's like, Hey Ari, how's it going? And he says to me, Ari, well, let us tell you who's in the call. I was like, oh, great. Didn't know who else would be there.  

The next thing I hear is my name is Mike I'm CEO. I was like, oh, this is good. My name is John I'm head of global I.T. . Even Better. My name is Julie I'm head of global marketing. 

Amazing. I mean, everybody on this call was basically a decision-maker. Like they were all there at one time. If it's going to happen, it's going to happen now. So I introduced myself. I give him a live demo over the web or product, showing them how it all works. I started this noise when the phone call like, wow, this is great this is amazing. This is fantastic. They start asking me all kinds of questions. How does it work? How do we install it? Of course, I had all the answers, you know, I was competent time and there were so much chemistry on this phone call. It was like a love fest on the phone. You know what I'm talking about. It just felt so right. 

Everything. Perfect. Perfect hours going by Ms. Questions. I'm doing everything I was taught to do build relationships. Answer objections, build repor, everything. What songs about I was a student back then and the call comes through a closing an hour later. And my context to me, all right, this is great. We love it. 

Look, give us a call a couple of weeks, follow up with us and we'll move this thing forward.  

I was like, oh yeah, this is awesome. And I said, my goodbyes, I took my hand and I reached for the speakerphone. As I'm reaching for the phone, by complete accident. I hit the mute button instead of the off button. 

They were right next to each other and a small click happened and they thought I hung up the phone. In that split second a voice in my head says, Ari, go to the dark side, be a fly on the wall, go where no one's ever gone before in the world of sales. And I pulled my thumb by for a couple of seconds. They start talking amongst themselves, thinking I had left them. 

And this is not a trick question, but what would you imagine they would have said after a call like that, what would you expect them to stop their call like that?  

Josh Steimle:

Well, you'd hope they'd be talking about how wow, that was great. That was awesome. We're going to buy that stuff. Let's get this done.  

Ari Galper:

That's what you'd expect, but let me share what I heard word for word. 

They said, "we're not going to go with him. keep using him for more information and make sure we shop someplace else, cheaper."  

Knife in the heart. Twist. I was in a state of shock.  

Josh Steimle:

You almost wish you didn't hear that.  

Ari Galper:

Exactly. I snapped out of it. 

I hit the off button. Said to me, what did I do wrong? I was friendly. I was competent relationship building, authentic. I did everything I was taught to do. And the first big epiphany hit me. And that was this, somewhere along the way, it has become socially acceptable not to tell the truth to people who sell.  

It's okay to say things like, sounds good, send me information. Oh, we're definitely interested. Oh wait, send us a proposal. Without any intention at all of a buyer. And I asked myself, I can't lose this going on. Why were they afraid to just tell me the. truth?  

I'd be okay with that either way. And then I realized that the reason why this is going on, and there's an invisible river pressure that flows underneath every sale call you have with someone or process that you have with them pre-sale and unless you're moving depression of the process, they'll always feel from you that your agenda is your goal and not theirs. 

And they'll hold back from you and give you just a few breadcrumbs to basically chew on in the hope that you might make the sale, but you'll never get the truth with them. And you'll always be chasing what I call Somebody tells you things they want to hear, but you never want to buy it from you. And I said to myself, if I could crack the code on this thing, I could unlock this game and take the pressure out of the process and help people build trust. 

Other people to build a moment of vulnerability, where they open up to tell the truth and beginning that will just change the whole game of the whole industry that became Unlocked The Game, the whole program that we taught for the last 20 years, which is now of course a huge revolution, but it's, that's, that's the whole concept started. 

Josh Steimle:

Got it. So now in between that experience twenty years ago, and you wrote the book about five years ago "Unlock the Sales Game" what were you doing in between that?

Ari Galper:

So I quit my job after that call. I said enough’ s enough. This is- I feel so dehumanized and so rejected. I said to myself, I can't keep doing this, I've got to do something about it. So literally quit my job, started my own consulting business at the time. And I rented a room in a shopping mall in a basement, in San Diego. And I ran an ad in the paper that said, "How to Build Trust with People and Not Chase Them and Still Make the Sale". One hour workshop, and they in time, and like one person showed up, like 20 seats, and I was like, oh, this is really weird. But I guess I'm going to do my thing.

So, I started doing my thing. And then someone else shows up next week. And then I start building an audience. And then I got a couple clients. And then back then internet was taken off. And I did an e-book, a 20-page eBook that I sold on my website, it was $20 dollar per page, I figured that makes sense to me. And literally, I had this eBook that I sold for $20. And I added a chat box as to my eBook on my homepage that said, chat with Ari now. And it wasn't outsourced. It was really me. He will click that button. And they say, Is this really the author, Ari Galper? And I go, "Yeah!". And they said to me, well, how do you have time taught people like us? I mean, you must be busy. And I said to them, who else should I be talking to?

But so, people like you, people who want to open to my concept. So, I started getting clients that way. And it's how it really started to take off from that point forward.

Josh Steimle:

That's great. So, you built that up? So, you built up this consulting business first, right before the book?

Ari Galper:

That's correct. And then I went to corporate training, right, got some gigs doing that for a while. Then I tried every model you can do as a consultant. I tried membership programs, coaching programs, corporate consulting, I did all the different models trying to figure out what's the right one for me and, and what's sustainable and typical. forever to find what I do now.

But I wish I hired someone like myself years ago to save me from these S curves, you know, like hitting a wall and buying a program hitting a wall and buying a program. And, you know, because it takes a long time to figure out your model.

Josh Steimle:

And so how did you figure that out? And what can other authors listening to this learn from your experience?

Ari Galper:

Well, obviously, you know, you want to establish yourself first as what I call a trust authority, right, which is niching, down to a specific area where you're seen as a category of one, that a commodity, because a lot of consultants and coaches are viewed as a commodity, like, I will do coaching, well, you have to figure out a way to position yourself in a way where you're seen as the only choice for that audience. So, I spent a lot of time thinking about what's the problem to help people solve, and who is my ideal client. And I backed into that.

And from there, I just had to write my book. Over time, I started piecing this together, around matching the problems to the ideal client, because I knew if I messed that together, that would resonate with them, and have an audience coming chasing me versus me chasing them. So, I never ended up doing I did a lot of networking at the time, like old school shoe leather, you know, going to meetings and passing out business cards. I, I did all that.

But then once the internet had sort of taken off, I did Google AdWords to get people on my website to order my book. I got consulting from that. But then I add my eBook, then I turned my eBook into a real book over time. And that's over time. So, I built my IP out, which is doing real consulting work with real clients, learning what the problems were solving on the spot, recording those consultations, transcribing the consultations, and pulling out all the unique IP created on those calls on the fly.

Josh Steimle:

Got it. So now, how long did it take you to write your book? How long? I mean, you've been putting this together for years before you wrote it, of course, you're developing the ideas, you're collecting content. But once you decided I'm going to write a book, how long did it take?

Ari Galper:

90 days.

Josh Steimle:

 90 days. Was that just because you had all the content ready to go, you have essentially been teaching and training this?

Ari Galper:

Well, I knew it all. But it wasn't organized into an outline. And I want to be very, very careful not to put all my IP in that book. Because if it all went in there, there's no reason to hire me, then. That's the mistakes consultants do is they write this book, they put everything they know into it. And then people get it. And they go, I got it all. Now, I don't need to talk to anyone else.

So, what my whole approach is, when we develop our books, we just for clients, by the way, we book these books that contain value and content. But they the core content of the book is around the problems, not the solutions, meaning we amplify the issues and give ideas and concepts to think about. But there's no specific how to do this, how to do that. How do that because that's what we need to do work with them one on one on is all custom per person.

Josh Steimle:

Got it. So now when somebody does read the book, and they hire you, though, are they hiring you? So, they're very clear on what the problems are. And they see that you understand their problems because you've illustrated their problems really well. And so then is the idea then that they assume you have the solution since you understand the problem. So, well if you're not sharing the solution in the book at size?

Ari Galper:

What that does is, and you saw what we sent you, I believe in the mail. Did you get our stuff? You got our box, right?

Josh Steimle:

Yeah, I did. And it's like, I got to like the video thing and everything that was impressive. I've never seen anything like that.

Ari Galper:

That's called a trust box. What you just received. And when people received that prior to having a chat with us, that eliminates the conversation shifting to us asking what we do, because that's the thing with selling, if you end up with someone on the phone call with them and become very chatty. Oh, what do you do? Oh, what do you do? Because very social, as opposed to you want them sold on you prior to your first call. Because now when they come to us, it starts with how can you help me? Not what do you do? Right? That's the biggest mistake consultants make. Is it show up at a phone call with someone on LinkedIn or whatever, it becomes very much a two-way conversation?

Josh Steimle:

So, what do you do? If sorry, that's a different I'm not asking what do you do? But what do you do if you get on a phone call with somebody and they do ask what they say, so tell me more about what do you do? What's the proper answer for somebody who's doing trust-based selling?

Ari Galper:

What you say is this. You say I'll be happy to share with you. I'm happy to tell you everything that I do absolutely no problem at all. But it might make sense if you'd be open to it. We'll take a step back for a moment, you can walk me through a bit about your story a bit about your journey, and what your challenges are. And we'll go from there. Would you be open to that?

Josh Steimle:

And so, you're seeking to understand first you want to listen to them and have them tell you about their problems.

Ari Galper:

You got to set this up like a doctor-patient relationship. You're the doctor, you're the authority. You're the expert. They've got the problem. This is not an equal relationship. You're not friends. When you go to see a doctor, what's the first thing they say to you? They say, where does it hurt?

Josh Steimle:

Yep.

Ari Galper:

They don't say, "How's it going? Tell me about you. Tell me about me. Let's have a chat. Let's see it for a connection. Let's see if we're a fit!" They don't try and build a relationship with you. For a reason, because they know if they mix social norms, and the business norms, it gets so messy. You won't comply with their recommendation.

Josh Steimle:

Mm-hmm. Yeah, they just dive straight to it. Right? Yeah.

ri Galper:

Well, they have a bedside manners. Of course, they have empathy and warmth. I'm not suggesting being cold and mean. And you can still have, but you have to have the right language to create that connection that feels good for them.

Josh Steimle:

Yeah, got it. All right. So, what was that moment when you knew you had to write this book? Was there a specific moment? What did it develop over time?

Ari Galper:

Well, it started, what really hit me was when I had an initial call with someone that the call was shifting to me and not to them. The ball was moving in my court all the time. Tell me, Ari, how your programming helped me? Tell me how it's different. Why should I hire you? You're too expensive. I want to think about it. Every objection in the world was being created. Because they weren't sold on me. And that's the first call. And I was like, this has got to stop, I'm wasting my time here. And I can't help them, I've got to figure out a way to remove the resistance from the process. So, I wrote the book, to eliminate the resistance in advance. So, I can diagnose properly their problem on that first call.

Josh Steimle:

Got it. So, then you sit down, you write this book in 90 days, how did you go about publishing it?

Ari Galper:

So, I basically, at that point, had a large database of people who followed me, as you can imagine, over the years. So, I launched it to my own lists database at the time, put it on Amazon, and it just really connected with people, the messaging the stories. And that's where I started getting reviews and certainly taken off from there. But I wasn't looking to, I didn't publish the book to make money off the book in terms of sales, I wasn't concerned about volume. Because I'm in a low volume, high price point model, high price point business, I don't need 1000 people tomorrow, I'm happy with five clients or 10. The for the month, I don't need 100.

So, I wasn't trying to do this huge book launch the millions of sales. That wasn't my goal. I know that as a consultant and a coaching business, you can only scale so many clients. When you're doing one on one coaching, or even group coaching. I didn't want a business, I had a lot of people coming our way we have to deal with customer service, and credit cards and 24/7 people on the internet, saying dumb things to watts, you know what I don't need noise in our world, I wanted a streamlined business, only with ideal clients that we can handle.

Josh Steimle:

Got it. Because in your business, if you could get five or 10 Extra clients a month, that's game-changing, right?

Ari Galper:

And we do that every month at a very high price point. And that's the real key is when you can build yourself as a trusted authority in your space. And you. And you add in this process of discovery right now, which is the book in advance of the call, not giving me your IP, I'm going to show up in the call, you do it our way, our trust by selling way and you advance the conversation towards what we call road-mapping them onboarding them. In our model. I'm working on a new book right now actually around this called the one call sail. Cool. It's coming out next year all about how to onboard somebody on one call versus multiple calls. But if you get the system, right, it's just so streamlined. It's just it's great.

Josh Steimle:

So how can the authors or the entrepreneurs who want to be authors who are listening to this podcast, how can they take some of the lessons from your book from trust-based selling to apply to how they write their book and how they construct the content inside their book? How can we create more trust with that book?

Ari Galper:

Well, the key about the book is that it has to resonate with your audience. and resonate is a vibration. It's a feeling. And the feeling is deepest when the content of your book describes their problems, not your solutions, they don't really care about how you solve the problem. At that stage of the game, all they care about is that you understand their problems at a deep level. That's what trust is. Trust was someone else understands you more than anybody else. So, your content has to be organized in a way that lists out their top 10 or 15 biggest challenges they have, and you have to be able to unpack that and peel it back and really amplify the issues. They understand the depth of it. And they go, this guy just gets me. He resonates with me. I found him finally. See, they don't care about how you solve it. They just care about finding you.

Josh Steimle:

Yeah, because there is that assumption that if somebody understands you, then they can help you, then they can fix it even before they start talking about the solution, right?

Ari Galper:

That's why when you go to a doctor, or referred to a doctor, they're a doctor. Assume they're going to help you.

Josh Steimle:

Now, I just had an experience with this. The other day, I was having internet issues. And here we are, we're doing a podcast, we're doing video. If I have internet issues, that's a problem, right? I just moved to a new house. So, I started having these issues. And I called up the internet service provider, and I said, hey, I'm doing these zoom calls, and there's a delay, and I talked to customer support. And they said, oh, yeah, we see the problem, okay, we'll send somebody out, they send somebody out. I told them what the problem was, they replaced some equipment, it didn't solve the problem. So, I had to call Customer Support again. So, the guy came out yesterday. And I felt bad for him. Because I felt like I had to tell him, everything I had told customer support.

I knew He probably had a printout of everything I told the customer support, because it's an integrated system. It's all there. But I felt like I'm not letting this guy inside my house until I unload everything, I've been through with him. And that took about 15 minutes for me to tell him every step, we went through everything. We tested everything that we did to isolate this problem, because I didn't want to hear him say, oh, we're gonna replace this until I knew that he understood what I was dealing with and what the problem was. And once I explained it all to him, he said, hey, we're gonna replace this equipment. And I said, okay, I know you understand the problem, I'll trust you. Let's do whatever you say.

And he replaced that equipment, which, frankly, if he hadn't heard my problem, I would have been like, no, no, no, no, that's not the problem. I already tested that we already used that equipment, it was working at the old house just fine. But because he had listened to me, I was like, whatever you say, we'll do it. And you replace that equipment. And hey, here we are today. And it's actually working. So, I see what you're saying in action that once I was able to unload my problem, I just trusted that guy to do whatever he had to do, because I knew he understood where I was coming from.

Ari Galper:

What drives human behavior is the need to be understood.

Josh Steimle:

And to his credit, he never cut me off. He never interrupted, he never tried to solve my problem before I was done. He just let me talk for 15 minutes. And finally, I said, Okay, that's it. That's everything. He's like, okay, we're gonna replace this equipment. Okay, that was it.

Ari Galper:

Good.

Josh Steimle:

So now you've been building your consulting business with your book. How have you managed to get your book in the right hands? I mean, you say people find out about it, it spreads. But what's some of the marketing that you've done? Has it been all word of mouth? Or how do you get your book out there in the hands of the right people?

Ari Galper:

Well, I have a show I do once a month on LinkedIn called stump the guru. But people jump in live and try to stop me with their toughest sales challenges. And I've watched that show and they jumped the buy my book right away. So, a lot of people a lot of buying it first off, my homepage unlocked the game and but also, if we get leads that come through to us like opportunities who want to reach out to us and have a chat with one on one, we ship them the book as a surprise gift in advance of the call with us. Because our rule is this.

We never talk to anybody in a consultation mode, complimentary until they have our book in their hands. First, that's our rule will never change will never show up on a call with somebody without that book in their hand for us, because we know we don't do that the balls in our court and now we're backwards again, in terms of describing what we do.

Josh Steimle:

Yeah. And the book is such a trust piece. How do you feel like the book has changed the game for you just having that book?

Ari Galper:

It's changed everything. Because we've learned how to use it strategically in a way that eliminates the sales process, a sales pitch that we used to do in the old days, I no longer have to explain what I do to somebody. Like if someone said to me, Ari, what do you do? I'd say, give the next two months of your time to sit down with me for two, I there's so much to tell them. There's no way I'll describe to you what I do. Or how are you different? I'm like, Are you kidding me just go get my book and call me afterwards. Like, I don't want to be in a position ever again, where I'm forced to sell myself verbally.

Josh Steimle:

So, here's a question for you. I'll try to stump the guru here. So sometimes you're already in a relationship with a client, but you sense that you're losing their trust. I mean, you're doing work, you're doing implementation, but you can tell that they are disappointed. They start asking questions like, you know, what are you spending this money on that we're paying you for? And where does that go? And can you show us how much you're spending on things. And you know that that's a sign that you're losing trust with them when they start wanting to micromanage and see details and see transparency and such. So, what do you do in that type of situation to kind of resell the deal or to reestablish trust, when you already had it, but you've started losing it?

Ari Galper:

Well, first thing we'll do is we'll apologize. Fall on our sword. And honestly apologize for whatever they think is gone wrong. It's the first thing we'll do will not defend ourselves will not rectify the solution will apologize, genuinely. Then what we'll do is we'll identify and analyze and see if we can rectify it. If it's on our end, we'll fix it. If we try and rectify it, but they're still coming at us. Like it's getting a little dysfunctional. Now, you know, I'm talking about like, this is not healthy right now. On Fire, though. I fire a lot of clients all the time, who don't behave in a way that's conducive to learning and growing. And once Well, someone goes through our net worth about our business, who just shouldn't be here with us. And they get exited quickly.

Josh Steimle:

Yeah, because sometimes, I mean, sometimes it might be you the consultant who's falling short, but other times it's that the client has unrealistic expectations, right?

Ari Galper:

Exactly. Correct. Correct.

Josh Steimle:

And so, if they have unrealistic, unrealistic expectations, one solution obviously, is you fire them. But what have you seen in the way of repairing those unmet expectations? Is it just have an open conversation? Or how can you if you get into that back-and-forth game of like, No, we're really good. We know what we're doing.

Ari Galper:

We never defend ourselves. We defuse the situation. We defuse the tension. We foreigners who are we always say you're right. It's our fault. Mm hmm. And that turns a bowl into a lamb. Mm hmm. It's amazing what that does. And it's truthful, it probably is our fault. As hey, look, if you'd be open to it, give us a chance to fix this. And we can fix it, what you will be good to go. If for some reason, we can't change whatever we got to change, we'll just disengage at that point. That's it. Yeah. I'm not going to try to salvage everybody. That's not my goal. My goal is to be reasonable, open and try and solve the problem. If you are comfortable with that process, they got other issues to deal with

Josh Steimle:

Got it. So, tell us about some of your success stories. Can you give us any case studies of clients that you've worked with and how you got them in?

Ari Galper:

So many. Over 20 years, but I'll tell you recently, I've been working with financial advisor, privately who as a private client. Typical financial advisor, they have multiple steps in the process, right, that initial call with someone to get to know them better, at one call qualify them three or four calls to educate them on what they do. And he was telling me that he was losing the opportunities dropping between each of his steps like he, they drop off he called them back they wouldn't call him back and it wasn't healthy, respectful for him and all that do that.

So, I'm working with him now to do what I call the one call sale process, which is how to condense the process to one conversation now, and he's just told me recently, and I've exerted this from a zoom call we had a few weeks ago, but he says he's now at 100% conversion. On every single call he has, as long as we're qualified, upfront, meaning they have the assets to work with. He's onboarded them on one call. And that, to me is the dream mess. People think themselves. That's impossible. Now, I'm not talking about pressure somebody yes or no, I mean, getting them to be comfortable saying yes, with you beginning into the right fit, and not tasting them. And that, to me, is my ultimate success stories that have our clients, converting their leads on one single conversation.

Josh Steimle:

That's great. Give us some other stories. I love hearing these

Ari Galper:

I'll tell you a story. I recently had someone call my office, and they just called in randomly, and they won't watch my work for like 15 years have been following me 15 years. And he's like Ari, I gotta tell you something. I was like, what? You saved my marriage. I was like, What? What do you mean by that? My wife and I were on the verge of divorcing. And I found your materials. And I've been studying them for a long time. And then I realized I was the problem. I wasn't communicating correctly. I wasn't listening. I wasn't building trust with her. I was stepping into her role of my agenda, not her agenda. And I changed my approach my mindset. Now we've connected, we're not divorced, and we saved our marriage. And I got to thank you for that.

And I said to myself, that's what this is about. It's about trust-based communication, building relationships with people in a way where you let go of your goal. And you focus in on their world and a guy creates pure trust with people.

Another story I have for you is I spoke a few years ago on large stage 1000 people, I think, and in my talk, some guy runs down the stage, like up the stage. Out of nowhere I'm like, whoa, how can I help you sir?

I go, do you have your own business?

He goes, No.

I go. So why do you want to talk to me?

Because I have a teenage son.

I was like yeah? What going on? He says, well, he comes home every night, past curfew, got a new car, and he comes home past curfew. He walks in the front door. He has his little ear your pad. Phone's on and he walks right past me. And he and I cannot connect to each other the night passing each other teenage son probably have to tell you know what I'm talking about. And I need a way to connect with my son.

So, he studied our materials and worked with us. And he came back to me, and he said to me Ari guess what happened? I sent him home one night, he comes to the front door, I took a deep breath. I lowered my voice like you taught me. And I said to him, Son, would you be open to the idea of us working together? Solve this problem of you coming home every night? Would you be open to that? And his son says, are you on drugs dad? What are you drinking? What's going on? He’s not used to like, this kind of communication was Dad used to like, you know, why are you late? Why are you late, but he's not used to being connected to on a deep level. And then they connect. Now they're best friends. Because his father has learned how to communicate with the son, and his son is now giving his dad his trust. All from the book!

Josh Steimle:

Mmhmm. Yep. This is some great stuff. I'm actually thinking about clients I'm working with right now. And I'm like, Alright, I'm gonna use some of this stuff on some of the clients that I'm dealing with. And we'll see how that goes. This is great.

Ari Galper:

Right.

Josh Steimle:

What are some of the other tips that you've acquired as a published author? What are some of the other bits of advice that you would give to the aspiring authors out there listening to this?

Ari Galper:

I would say get the book out as fast as possible. Don't make a perfect, get it produced however you do it. You got to have a trust asset, a physical trust, asset and physical and I would suggest you not do an e book by the way. I like old school in the mail, physical books. Last thing you want is your book to be on a PDF. In someone's inbox opened, I scan and delete. No one's printing 100 pages out through a printer, read your book, unless they're really unusual, I'm sorry.

So have it created, print, print them and start sending the people if you want to advance or have people order them and you don't have to even sell your book, if you don't want offers a free gift to your market. Have you order it as a free gift to them. And that becomes inbound lead generation for you. leads coming inbound by them ordering your book. That's how we do it in certain circumstances. I did a talk only a couple weeks ago a big webinar to 500 people at the end of my book as a free gift. And half of them ordered my book and how much now are on our calendar to join us the next quarter. So, the book can be the way to generate qualified leads for you as well.

Josh Steimle:

Mm hmm. All right. Ari, this has been so great talking to you, there's been so much value you've given us in just a short time here. If people want to reach out and connect with you, where's the best place for them to find you?

Ari Galper:

Best place to go is unlockthegame.com. There's a free intro course there, my books there, of course. And of course, reach out to us for a consultation and see what it's like to have a call. That's without being told anything. It's a whole experience in itself. Just to have a call like that. And on LinkedIn, say hello to me there, let’s connect. I'm accessible there as I mentioned, come on my show “Stump the Guru” and try and stump me it'll be a lot of fun.

Josh Steimle:

Is there a particular type of client that's ideal for you? I mean, you say you sell high ticket. What does that mean?

Ari Galper:

No. So our ideal client is someone in a business that has low volume, higher price point, and high trust. That's the quadrant. We operate in like advisory coaching, consulting, high transaction sales. If you're in that kind of Squadron right, there. You need us immediately. If you're in a high-volume, low-price point, probably not.

Josh Steimle:

Got it. Okay. And you're in Sydney, but you operate worldwide, right?

Ari Galper:

Absolutely. Yes, we have consulting clients all over the world, I think we're good to go. If you want next year, my book comes out, we can talk again- "The One Call Sale". It's just all about how to depress your sales cycle, from multiple steps into one single conversation with somebody, not chase them. Now follow up with them how to get a yes or no on one call with them without pressure at the end. It's a magical experience to experience that.

Josh Steimle:

And is there are there certain steps to that, or how is that done?

Ari Galper:

There's a roadmap to that there's what we call the iceberg, you have to go down iceberg, it's a metaphor for how to unpack their problem, to go below the surface of it, to amplify it, to build the impact of it. And ask this question at the end, which is, is this a priority for you to solve or not love is a way to language this so that they can really own it, own their own problem and ask you for help. It's a reverse because you're not selling, you're, you're, you're diagnosing their problem where they realize they have to deal with it. And they say to you, how can you help me it's kind of like you're engineering a process of trust and vulnerability on that one call? That's all. I'm coaching that now with clients. That's what I'm teaching.

Josh Steimle:

Okay. You know, I'm going to ask you another question, another stump the guru question, except I don't think you'll be stumped. But so, you brought up how in your book, you share the problems, but not the solutions. Because if you share the solutions, then people can just read the book.

Now I actually tell my people, the opposite. I say, share everything, share all your secrets, tell people exactly how to do it. But I'm thinking about the person who makes their money on the implementation, not on the consulting or advice necessarily. So, what I've seen is, when I tell people how to do something, then that builds the trust. And then they say, wait a second, though, I don't want to do this. I don't want to implement this. I don't want to do the search engine optimization. I don't want to do the analytics. I don't want to do this stuff, like, but this guy obviously knows how to do it. So, let's just hire this guy, or let's hire his company to actually do the implementation. What's your response to that? Am I wrong? Are you wrong? Are we both right?

Ari Galper:

No one's wrong, it's just that I find that if you put all the energy into really unpacking the problems, it's more powerful than often the solution as well.

Josh Steimle:

Got it. Yeah. And I see where you're coming from on that. So, it's, it's interesting, because I've got to think about some of the content I put out there now and how to emphasize the problem rather than the solution because it's so easy to get stuck on the solution and say, I've got this great recipe, I've got this formula. I've got this method that's gonna solve all your problems. But if the problem if the person saying well, you don't even understand my problem, how could you possibly give me a solution.

Ari Galper:

People won't believe you anyways.

Josh Steimle:

Yeah. Interesting. All right. Well, that's good. Ari, thanks so much for being with us here today on the Published Author Podcast. Appreciate it.

Ari Galper: 

Thank you for having me.

Josh Steimle:

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